Auto Repair in Mint Hill – Why Right-To-Repair is So Important

In a world where we have more electronic and automated devices than ever, it seems like part of our life goes on hold when one breaks. How long can you go without your cell phone, for example? It may be pretty tough – you’ll miss phone calls from your boss or spouse, you can’t check social media for entertainment, etc. But what if when something broke, your only option was to take it to the manufacturer and pay whatever they demanded to get it fixed?

In a world of no right-to-repair laws, that’s exactly what you’d be living in, and it wouldn’t be cheap.

 

The basic concept behind right-to-repair is that you, the buyer of a product, own the device you purchased and should be able to access information and parts to repair it. The manufacturer has no right to have a monopoly on parts or service because once they sell the device, it isn’t theirs anymore. In the automotive world, this is huge.

 

Up until a landmark case in 2013, automakers were legally free to keep things like schematics, diagnostic tools, and specialty tools out of the hands of John Q. Everyman… and at the same time, out of the hands of independent repair shops and even the national chains. This meant that for major repairs, especially electronic ones, you had to go to the dealer to get your car repaired.

 

In 2013, Massachusetts passed the first major right to repair law for automobiles. The Massachusetts Right to Repair Initiative, as it was known, said that all people from regular owners to full on repair shops had a right to information and tools already available to dealers.

 

Shortly after, most automakers agreed to follow the ruleset of Massachusetts nationwide. By doing this, everyone everywhere now had access to technical information and tools on their cars.

 

This is not the first time laws like these have been passed. The Magnuson Moss Warranty Act, for example, states that using aftermarket repair parts on your vehicle – things you may find at NAPA or Advance Auto Parts, for example – cannot and will not void your warranty. This is also good for the original equipment manufacturers or “OEMs” – the companies that built the original parts installed as your car was being assembled – as this creates a second market for them to sell in. Companies like Denso, ACDelco, and even tire companies like Michelin don’t have to sell just to Chevrolet or Toyota. They can sell directly to consumers and auto shops too. On top of all of this, aftermarket parts are required to be of equal quality of the original parts installed.

 

So if the parts you can find at an auto parts store are cheaper, just as good, and available to you and your favorite local mechanic, why should you have to go to the dealer?

 

You shouldn’t. That’s why right-to-repair laws are so important for you, the consumer. They protect the fundamental concept of capitalism – competition makes for better and cheaper options.

 

As the technology world grows, you’re likely to see this happen in the cell phone and computer world too. 18 states already have laws about this as of March 2018, according to The Verge.

 

To recap, right-to-laws are designed to keep manufacturers from creating a monopoly on the upkeep of devices, including cars. These allow places like independent auto shops and parts stores to exist, and also help keep costs down. Overall, right-to-repair laws are designed with the consumer in mind.

Have any questions about these laws and how they impact you? Feel free to call Manchester Auto and Tire of Mint Hill at 704-545-4597, email us at kenmanchester1@gmail.com, or check us out on Facebook at facebook.com/ManchesterAutoAndTireOfMintHill

Ken Manchester